Post Tagged with: "slavery"

Statue of Liberty

Christianity is the Only Hope for Liberty in our Land

While at the conference, I had the privilege of teaching the Biblical view of law and government, presenting the fact that the Holy Scriptures were without a doubt the foundation of our Constitutional Republic. In one session, I pointed out the critical importance of the sacred oath taken by every office holder. One parent asked if it is possible to see our country restored by means of reformation of civil government alone?

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Abraham Lincoln First Inauguration, March 4, 1861

The Uncivil War

In American schools the Civil War is a one trick pony. It was all about slavery and that is all it was about. There can be no doubt that slavery was a blight upon the history of the United States. However, slavery was not the only issue at stake in the Civil War. There was one other that took center stage in the minds of many: State’s Rights.

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Declare Victory in the War on Inequality

Declare Victory in the War on Inequality

There is no doubt that our great nation’s formation reflected the cultural norms of the late eighteenth century with its sexual and race based biases. These cultural inequities were addressed after years of debate, a bloody civil war, and the passage of a number of Constitutional Amendments. Regulations were implemented to enforce these laws and affirmative action was created as a temporary measure to accelerate the change. But the question now is how long is “temporary” and when will the need for affirmative action ever end? Now fifty years later, maybe it’s about time to declare victory in this War on Inequality.

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A New Life, a New Name

A New Life, a New Name

Born a slave in New York in 1797, she spoke only Dutch until she was sold at age 11. Suffering hardships, her third master made her marry an older slave with whom she had five children. In 1827, she escaped to Canada. After New York abolished slavery, she returned as a domestic servant and helped with Elijah Pierson’s street-corner preaching. Her name was Sojourner Truth.

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Freedom is Not an Excuse for Licentiousness

Freedom is Not an Excuse for Licentiousness

A decade prior to the Civil War there were two major political parties in the United States: Democrats, favoring freedom of choice to own slaves; and Whigs, wanting a big tent party. In Ripon, Wisconsin, anti-slavery activists met for the first time on February 28, 1854, then held their first State Convention in Jackson, Michigan, JULY 6, 1854. This new political party believed marriage should be one man and one woman. Naming their party “Republican,” their chief plank was “to prohibit…those twin relics of barbarism: polygamy and slavery.”

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Henry Clay addressing the U.S. Senate, Daniel Webster is seated to the left of Clay, John C. Calhoun is to the left of the Speaker's chair, circa 1855

The Common Father of Whites and Blacks

“I would rather be right than President,” stated Henry Clay, who died JUNE 29, 1852. The son of a Baptist minister, Henry Clay was elected Speaker of the U.S. House 6 times, having served in Congress over 40 years with Daniel Webster and John Calhoun. The State of Kentucky placed Henry Clay’s statue in the U.S. Capitol’s Statuary Hall.

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The Liberator. Volume VII. 1837. Edited by William Lloyd Garrison. Published by Isaac Knapp, Cornhill, Boston, Massachusetts

God-Given Rights Inherent in Every Human Being

William Lloyd Garrison published the Boston anti-slavery paper “Liberator” and founded the American Anti-Slavery Society in 1833. Suffering hundreds of death threats for his politically incorrect stand on the value of human life, William Lloyd Garrison died MAY 24, 1879. In “W.P. and F.J.T. Garrison,” 1885-89, William Lloyd Garrison wrote: “Wherever there is a human being, I see God-given rights inherent in that being, whatever may be the sex or complexion.”

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Christianity Elevated the Black Man

Christianity Elevated the Black Man

Born in a slave hut APRIL 5, 1856, was Booker T. Washington. As a young man he attended Hampton Institute in Virginia and later Wayland Baptist Seminary in Washington, DC. He went on to found Tuskegee Institute in Alabama and recruited George Washington Carver. He was the first African American to have his image on a U.S. coin and postage stamp.

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Slavery is Contrary to the Law of God

Slavery is Contrary to the Law of God

Rufus King, born MARCH 24, 1755, was one of the youngest signers of the U.S. Constitution, only 32 years old. A Harvard graduate, Rufus King was an aide to General Sullivan during the Revolutionary War. Rufus King later served as U.S. Minister to England and a U.S. Senator from New York. He said, “I hold that all laws or compacts imposing any such condition as slavery upon any human being are absolutely void because they are contrary to the law of nature, which is the law of God.”

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Burdened Conscience in Life, Burdened Soul in Death

Burdened Conscience in Life, Burdened Soul in Death

Susan B. Anthony, whose face is on a U.S. dollar coin, a 3-cent stamp and whose statue is in the U.S. Capitol Rotunda, died MARCH 13, 1906. Susan B. Anthony’s religious upbringing instilled in her the concept that every one is equal before God and motivated her to crusade for freedom for slaves and a woman’s right to vote. Opposing liquor, drunkenness and abortion, Susan encountered mobs, armed threats, objects thrown at her and was hung in effigy.

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