Post Tagged with: "Fourteenth Amendment"

Are Anchor Babies Really American Citizens?

Are Anchor Babies Really American Citizens?

Ever since he announced his candidacy for president in June, Donald Trump has been setting the agenda for the rest of the field. And so, naturally, his call to bring an end to birthright citizenship for illegal immigrants was all anybody could talk about last week.

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Birthright Citizenship: What’s That About?

Birthright Citizenship: What’s That About?

The Daily Signal brings us a great resource explaining the debate over birthright citizenship in 90 seconds. The issue is hot right now because the bombastic Donald Trump has managed to bring the issue of illegal immigration (i.e. invasion) to the forefront of American politics, and one aspect of that is the anchor babies which the pro-illegal immigration crowd are trying to use as a lever to allow invaders to get amnesty and remain in our country after having broken our laws.

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The Fourteenth Amendment Does Not Mandate Same-Sex Marriage

The Fourteenth Amendment Does Not Mandate Same-Sex Marriage

Generally, courts have ruled for same-sex marriage using either the “due process clause” or the “equal protection clause” of the Fourteenth Amendment, or both. That raises a simple question: is it really possible that when the Fourteenth Amendment was ratified in 1868 the framers intended that it sanction same-sex marriage? Of course not. The U.S. Constitution says nothing about same-sex marriage. Then, how could the Constitution be manipulated to support a decision in favor of same-sex marriage? Well it has not been easy

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The Well-Meant Door to Tyranny

The Well-Meant Door to Tyranny

The 14th Amendment was adopted JULY 28, 1868, because southern States, though forced to end slavery by the 13th Amendment, did not grant citizenship to freed slaves. Yet after the Amendment was ratified, activist Federal Judges, applying evolution to the legal process, did just that, as Thomas Jefferson had forewarned Charles Hammond in 1821. The 14th Amendment soon became a door by which Federal Courts took authority over trade disputes, union strikes, and eventually religion, away from States’ jurisdiction.

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