Category: US Constitution

Constitution Restrains Obama Spending Authority

Constitution Restrains Obama Spending Authority

Soon, the Obama Administration will be able to borrow money to refinance and expand the $16.4 trillion national debt without any permission from Congress. That is, if House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi gets her way. There’s just one little problem: the United States Constitution.

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Ronald Reagan and Robert Bork, 1987

The Death Of Original Intent

Many Americans are oblivious to the meaning of original intent. A century ago, it was the established and respected legal approach to determining constitutionality and applying law. The question was, “How did the framers of the constitution intend this passage to be applied to our case?” But in the twentieth century, the original intent of the framers was seen as irrelevant by some.

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Ninth Amendment

The Ninth Amendment: The Value of Our Unenumerated Rights

We recently observed the 221th anniversary of the Bill of Rights, taught in every school in America. Interestingly, certain rights are not enumerated, and yet people still benefit from them. The Ninth Amendment is my favorite: “The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people.” Few of us ever think about how the Ninth Amendment preserves all of our rights not cited in the Constitution.

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Bill of Rights

A Creature Determined to Destroy Its Creators

Newly independent, the thirteen States were concerned that their new Government may become too powerful, as King George’s was. They insisted handcuffs be place on the power of the Federal Government. We call these the First Ten Amendments or Bill of Rights, ratified DECEMBER 15, 1791. These Amendments did not limit States or citizens, just the Federal Congress.

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Does the Constitution Allow ‘Mandatory Spending’?

Does the Constitution Allow ‘Mandatory Spending’?

In 2013, $2.2 trillion of the $3.65 trillion budget will be on so-called “mandatory” spending — a Washingtonian euphemism for automatic spending. It just operates on autopilot, and even increases of its own accord as a function of the rising population that qualifies for benefits and built-in cost-of-living adjustments. But is such a design constitutional?

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Hugh Williamson

A Preacher Who Signed the Constitution

A signer of the Constitution licensed to preach? This was Hugh Williamson, delegate from North Carolina, born DECEMBER 5, 1735. At age 24 he studied theology in Connecticut, was admitted to the Presbytery of Philadelphia and preached two years, visiting and praying for the sick, till a chronic chest weakness caused him to seek another career. He traveled to London to study medicine, but not before seeing the Boston Tea Party, of which he testified before a Privy Counsel that if Britain did not change its policy, the Colonies would rebel.

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