Don’t Ignore Any Foreign Influence

Some are calling for an investigation of whether Russia tried to influence our 2016 elections.

Some of the founding fathers of our nation warned that foreigners would try to influence our elections and our policies. So, no foreign attempts to influence our elections and policies should be ignored.

But, in 2008, I published a report which suggested that China was spending hundreds of millions of dollars to influence that election for Obama. The main stream media ignored my report. In August 2016, I updated that report with more information.

Any investigation of foreigners trying to influence our election should be expanded to investigate all attempts by all foreign interests – including China and Mexico.

Anyone interested can search “China influencing American elections, Woodrow Wilcox” to find the most current article that I wrote on this matter (with an interview video).

4 Comments

  1. Thisoldspouse says:

    What is considered “influence?” Mere advocacy, which national leader have that right?

    • Bob Ellis says:

      The claim is that Russia attempted to help Trump win the election by hacking and releasing Democrat emails, which cast Democrats in a bad light.

      While I wouldn’t doubt that to be true (Trump and some of his associates are Putin fanboys), even if it is true, I don’t think it made much difference, and here’s why:

      http://www.americanclarion.com/2016/11/09/donald-trump-finally-how-rino-can-win-the-presidency-46357/

      http://www.dailywire.com/news/11546/4-reasons-russia-didnt-swing-election-trump-ben-shapiro

      In other words, there were much more powerful forces in play that helped Trump triumph over Clinton. After the Titanic hit the iceberg, would it have made much of a difference if someone drilled an additional hole in the hull?

      But I think it’s wise for us to be aware and fully understand the circumstances when a foreign figure or power attempts to influence our elections. If we are alert to and wise to the devices of foreign influences, we are better able to weigh such information accordingly when similar things happen in the future.

      • Thisoldspouse says:

        Thanks for the answers. I’m just trying to understand the claim of “influence” that is casting a pall of illegitimacy over this, and any other, election.

        • Bob Ellis says:

          Though I’m not even remotely a Donald Trump fan, I think claims of “illegitimacy” are way, way overblown. This was a spoonful of water in an already sinking ship for Clinton (and nothing we didn’t already know about the corrupt scumbags on the Left).

          The hacking was illegal, but the release of the information (once already hacked and obtained) was not in and of itself illegal or even an “improper influence,” though it WAS an attempt to influence the election. Not all attempts to influence or illegal or even improper, but we should understand their context and where they’re coming from so that we can assign the proper weight to them.